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Sunshine Chinchillas

Dominant Mutations

Standard Grey – Naturale – Natural Coloration – Agouti

This coloration is the natural coat of wild chinchillas. It is the base color when there are no dominant or recessive gene mutations showing. This chinchilla will be a bluish grey hue on the head, neck, shoulders and back; this area can range from light grey to jet black. These shades are classified into four phases; these are light, medium, dark and extra dark standard. The coat will have lighter grey along the sides, hips, and tail. This color should have a bright white belly, black eyes, and dark ears.


Common "flaws" standard grey animals are prone to when not bred properly can be "dirty" bellies known as off-color or not pure white, breaks in veiling around the neck, and "reddish" fur discoloration in dark to extra dark animals. To combat these flaws, standards should always be bred back to high quality large, blocky animals with good clarity of color and dense fur. Exceptional quality standard grey animals will have proper veiling regardless of how dark or light their veiling may be; these animals should be big and blocky with good conformation, a smooth fur texture and a clear blue hue to the fur coloration.


The standard grey can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Exceptional standard greys should be the backbone and foundation of a strong herd of animals. It's always a good idea to breed back to standard grey every few generations to increase fur density without losing size or conformation.

Image By: RDZC Ranch

http://www.rdzcranch.com/

Mosaic – White Mosaic – The Wilson White - Silver

The Wilson white was the very first chinchilla mutation to appear, it was developed on the Blythe Wilson Ranch in Redding, California in 1955. It is thought that the Wilson white gene can only exist in the heterozygous state, this is why white animals are never bred to other white animals. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Wilson white gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A white to white mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

This dominant mutation can have many coat pattern variations due to the condition called “mosaicism.” This causes certain cells to contain this gene while other cells do not, allowing for the standard grey color to show through. This means that areas containing the Wilson white gene will have fur appearing white, while areas not containing this gene will appear to be the base color of the animal (in this case, standard grey). This creates an unpredictable and random pattern of coloration from chin to chin, proving impossible to breed for specific markings. This color can be any pattern of white; all white, mostly white, frosted grey, mostly grey, or unique unusual shapes, patterns and splotches of grey throughout the coat. All mosaics will have black eyes and dark ears, like standard grey. Chinchillas that are an even light grey over the top with white markings are often referred to as “silver.” Silver is not its own mutation.

Common "flaws" white animals are prone to when not bred properly can be a "cottony" fur texture meaning their fur is more wiry, kinky, swirly or "singy." Other imperfections can be a yellowing or creaminess in coloration and loose, soft fur that does not stand on its own. To combat these flaws, mosaics should always be bred back to high quality large, blocky animals with good clarity of color and dense fur. Quality mosaic animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture and good clarity of color. 

The Wilson white can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another animal with the Wilson white gene. 

Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

The Tower Beige - Heterozygous Beige - Hetero Beige – Homozygous Beige - Homo Beige

The Tower beige is a dominant mutation that is a brownish beige color to light champagne color. An animal of this color was first born on the Ranch of Ned Jensen of Oregon in 1955. Jensen's remaining herd was later sold to Nick Tower, who after years of extensive care was able to develop a line of the color after believing the first animal to be sterile. This color should have a bright white belly with pink or red eyes, and pink ears. Chinchillas who only carry one copy of this gene are considered heterozygous, while those that have two copies of the gene are homozygous. Hetero beiges (first image) will be a darker beige hue compared to their bright light homo beige (second image) counterparts. Sometimes referred to as “champagne,” this is an incorrect term for these colors.

Common "flaws" beige animals are prone to when not bred properly can be oxidation leading to the fur turning a reddish, copper or orange coloration when viewed under show lights. In recent years, many beige bred to dark standard grey animals have lead to darker beige animals. This has caused a considerable amount of beige animals to no longer have the clear tan or lavender hue to the fur that is desirable. However, animals bred to good quality light standard greys will keep a lighter veiling that allows for the beige coloration to stay bright. Quality beige animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture and good clear lavender tones to the fur. 

The Tower beige (both hetero and homo) can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. To achieve the homo beige coloration, exceptional quality beiges should be bred together to give their offspring two copies of the Tower beige gene. 

Both Images By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Black Velvet – Black – The Gunning Black - TOV

This coloration is a dominant mutation that has the Gunning black gene. This color first popped up on the Ranch of Bob Gunning of Davenport, Washington in the 1960s. This color will have an evenly veiled shade of black across the face, head, neck, shoulders, back and hips. This black then fades to grey further down the sides. This color should have a bright white belly, black eyes, and dark ears. When combined with other mutations, this gene is referred to as TOV or "Touch of Velvet." It is thought to not be able to exist in the homozygous state, therefore it can only be heterozygous. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Gunning black gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A TOV to TOV mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

Common "flaws" black velvet animals are prone to when not bred properly can be "dirty" bellies known as off-color or not pure white, these are more common in super dark black velvets as the veiling starts to go too far down into the gray sides and belly. Other common imperfections are breaks in veiling around the neck or "halos", and "reddish" fur discoloration in the dark black fur. To combat these flaws, black velvets should always be bred back to high quality large, blocky animals with good clarity of color, dense fur, exceptional veiling and a bright white belly. Exceptional quality black velvet animals should be large and blocky, have a smooth fur texture with complete veiling that has no breaks in it and a stark white belly.

The Gunning black can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another TOV animal (black velvet, brown velvet, TOV mosaic, etc).

Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

TOV Mosaic – TOV White – White Black Velvet

This mutation contains both the Wilson white and Gunning black velvet genes. The Wilson white and Gunning black genes can only exist in the heterozygous state, this is why white animals are never bred to other white animals and a TOV is never bred to another TOV. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Wilson white or Gunning black gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A white to white or TOV to TOV mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

They can have many coat pattern variations due to the condition called “mosaicism.” This causes certain cells to contain this gene while other cells do not, allowing for the black velvet color to show through in some areas. This means that areas containing the Wilson white gene will have fur appearing white, while areas not containing this gene will appear to be the base color of the animal (in this case, black velvet). The white gene can also prevent any indication of the TOV gene to be visible as cells with mosaicism will be white and mask the black velvet coloring. This creates an unpredictable and random pattern of coloration from chin to chin, proving impossible to breed for specific markings. This color can be any pattern of white; all white, mostly white, frosted grey, mostly black velvet, or unique unusual shapes, patterns and splotches of black velvet throughout the coat. All TOV mosaics will have black eyes and dark ears. A common misconception with TOV mosaics is that they can be differentiated from a regular mosaic by the markings on their front paws. Paw "stripes" or "striping" does not indicate if the animal has the Black Velvet gene or not. Due to mosaicism, the best way to prove a white has the TOV gene is through a combination of lineage, visual characteristics, and breeding the animal.

Common "flaws" white animals are prone to when not bred properly can be a "cottony" fur texture meaning their fur is more wiry, kinky, swirly or "singy." Other imperfections can be a yellowing or creaminess in coloration and loose, soft fur that does not stand on its own. To combat these flaws, TOV mosaics should always be bred back to high quality large, blocky animals with good clarity of color and dense fur. Quality TOV mosaic animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture and good clarity of color. 

The TOV mosaic can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another animal with the Wilson white or Gunning black genes. 

Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Pink White – Beige Mosaic – Beige White

This mutation contains both the Wilson white and Tower beige genes. The Wilson white gene can only exist in the heterozygous state, this is why white animals are never bred to other white animals. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Wilson white gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A white to white mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. Although whites cannot be homozygous, the beige gene can. Thus, animals with the white gene and one beige gene are considered heterozygous (beige white), while those with two beige genes are considered homozygous (homo beige white). A homo pink white animal is pictured in the third photograph. Here bright red eyes and very faint markings can be seen on the face, these are light homo beige markings. 

They can have many coat pattern variations due to the condition called “mosaicism.” This causes certain cells to contain this gene while other cells do not, allowing for the beige color to show through. This means that areas containing the Wilson white gene will have fur appearing white, while areas not containing this gene will appear to be the base color of the animal (in this case, beige). This creates an unpredictable and random pattern of coloration from chin to chin, proving impossible to breed for specific markings. This color can be any pattern of white; all white, mostly white, mostly beige, or unique unusual shapes, patterns and splotches of beige throughout the coat. All pink whites will have red eyes and pink ears; those that are homozygous pink white will have brighter red eyes and snow white fur with or without faint markings of homo beige. Pink whites are often mistaken for being albino, this is not true. True albino chinchillas were very unhealthy; therefore, breeders did not attempt to breed them. True albinos lack pigmentation, whereas pink whites have pigmentation via the Tower beige gene.

Common "flaws" white animals are prone to when not bred properly can be a "cottony" fur texture meaning their fur is more wiry, kinky, swirly or "singy." Other imperfections can be a yellowing or creaminess in coloration and loose, soft fur that does not stand on its own. Due to the beige influence on a pink white animal, there will be some warmth to the color, this is acceptable as long as the color is clear with a strong, smooth fur texture. To combat these flaws, pink whites should always be bred back to high quality large, blocky animals with good clarity of color and dense fur. Quality pink white animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture and good clarity of color. 

The pink white (both hetero and homo) can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another animal with the Wilson white gene. To achieve the homo pink white coloration, exceptional quality pink white x beiges should be bred together to give their offspring two copies of the Tower beige gene. 

Images By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Brown Velvet - TOV Beige

This mutation consists of the Tower beige gene and the Gunning black velvet gene. This color will have an evenly veiled shade of dark brown across the face, head, neck, shoulders, back and hips. This brown then fades to beige further down the sides. This color should have a bright white belly, red eyes, and pink ears. Animals that are homozygous brown velvet will be a significantly much lighter shade of brown across the top and sides and will have very bright red eyes. Although the Gunning black gene cannot be homozygous, the beige gene can. Thus, brown velvets that have one copy of the beige gene are considered heterozygous, while those who inherited two beige genes are considered homozygous. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Gunning black gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A TOV to TOV mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

Common "flaws" brown velvet or TOV beige animals are prone to when not bred properly can be oxidation leading to the fur turning a reddish, copper or orange coloration when viewed under show lights. Due to how dark the veiling is, the brown coloration can be red if bred or housed incorrectly. Similar to black velvet animals, brown velvets can also have "dirty" bellies known as off-color or not pure white, this is common in super dark brown velvets as the veiling starts to go too far down into the beige sides and belly. Other common imperfections are breaks in veiling around the neck or "halos." To combat these flaws, brown velvets should always be bred back to high quality large, blocky animals with good clarity of color, dense fur, exceptional veiling and a bright white belly. Quality brown velvet or TOV beige animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture, complete fur veiling with no breaks in it, clear lavender tones to the fur and a stark white belly.

The brown velvet (both hetero and homo) can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another TOV animal. To achieve the homo brown velvet coloration, exceptional quality beiges x brown velvets should be bred together to give their offspring two copies of the Tower beige gene. 

Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Ebony - Hetero Ebony - Homo Ebony - The Tasco

This mutation consists of several genes that factor into this coloration, the main coloration was originally developed in Texas on Otto Munn's ranch in 1964. It is thought to be a cumulative dominant gene as the shade expresses itself in various ways depending on different factors. Although ebony does not require a carrier parent to express itself, the darkness and shading of the color can vary. This color can range from light ebony (first photo), medium ebony (second photo), dark ebony (third photo), and extra dark ebony (last photo). The belly should be grey to black depending on the shade of ebony, have black eyes, and dark ears. It is thought that this color cannot exist in a homozygous state, therefore “homo ebony” is not a true color. This term is often used to describe an animal that looks visibly jet black. Animals referred to as "hetero" ebony refer to lighter fur with a grey to black belly, grey sides, and a darker head, back, shoulders, and hips. Hetero ebonies can sometimes be mistaken for standard grey if they are very light. Pedigreed animals that have ebony within their lineage but appear standard should be listed as “standard ebony carrier or ebc.” This is to inform other breeders that the ebony gene can show up in future offspring if this animal is bred. Some genetics that may be linked to the ebony are the Tasco, the Busse, the French Blue, the Lester Black Recessive, the Treadwell Black and the Brouke Recessive Charcoal.


Common "flaws" in ebony animals are usually reddish or oxidized fur, castiness, loose fur or poor fur density, incomplete coloration to the belly if the animal is the lightest shade of ebony, and unsatisfactory size and conformation. Due to these flaws, ebony can be a tricky color to breed for. Great ways to combat these flaws would be to breed ebony animals to exceptional quality dark standard ebony carriers. Quality ebony animals should be large and blocky, with dense fur that does not lay down and bounces back when interrupted while the fur coloration has a clear blue hue. The bellies of these animals should always be grey to black with little to no oxidation.


The ebony can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc.


Images By: Sunshine Chinchillas

White Ebony – Ebony Mosaic

This mutation contains both the Wilson white and ebony genes. The Wilson white gene can only exist in the heterozygous state, this is why white animals are never bred to other white animals. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Wilson white gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A white to white mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring.


They can have many coat pattern variations due to the condition called “mosaicism.” This causes certain cells to contain this gene while other cells do not, allowing for the ebony color to show through in some areas. This means that areas containing the Wilson white gene will have fur appearing white, while areas not containing this gene will appear to be the base color of the animal (in this case, ebony). This creates an unpredictable and random pattern of coloration from chin to chin, proving impossible to breed for specific markings. This color can be any pattern of white; all white, mostly white, frosted grey, mostly ebony, or unique unusual shapes, patterns and splotches of black or ebony throughout the coat. White ebonies will have black eyes and dark ears. The ebony gene gives a wrapping effect to the belly, which can allow for ebony or black coloration on the belly of the animal. The only way to ensure a mosaic has the ebony gene is a combination of lineage, visible coloration and breeding the animal.


Common "flaws" white animals are prone to when not bred properly can be a "cottony" fur texture meaning their fur is more wiry, kinky, swirly or "singy." Other imperfections can be a yellowing or creaminess in coloration and loose, soft fur that does not stand on its own. Due to the influence of ebony on the white coloration, the fur can be prone to losing density if not bred to exceptional quality animals with good clarity and dense fur. Quality white ebony animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture and good clarity of color.


The white ebony can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another animal with the Wilson white gene.


First Image belongs to RDZC Ranch:

http://www.rdzcranch.com/


Second Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Tan - Beige Wrap - Pastel - Chocolate - Homo Tan

This mutation consists of the ebony gene and the Tower beige gene. Due to the ebony genes cumulative effect, the shading and darkness of each tan varies. This color can range from light tan (first photo), medium tan, dark tan, and extra dark tan (second photo). The ebony gene gives a wrapping effect to the belly, which can make it a beige to dark brown color depending on the shade of tan. Tans will have red eyes and pink ears like a beige. The lightest of the heterozygous tan shades can sometimes appear to be beige, however they will not have a white belly like a true beige. Pedigreed animals that have ebony within their lineage but appear beige should be listed as “beige ebony carrier or ebc.” This is to inform other breeders that the ebony gene can show up in future offspring if this animal is bred. Although ebony cannot exist in a homozygous state, the beige gene can. Therefore a “homo tan” is possible if the animal has two copies of the beige gene (third photo).


Homo tans tend to stay very light, but are slightly darker than a homo beige. The ebony gene gives a wrapping effect to the belly, which makes it the same color all the way around. Homo tans will have extremely bright red eyes and pink ears like a homo beige. Pedigreed animals that have ebony within their lineage but appear homo beige should be listed as “homo beige ebony carrier or ebc.” This is to inform other breeders that the ebony gene can show up in future offspring if this animal is bred. Light and homo tans are sometimes wrongly referred to as pastels and champagnes. However, the pastel term technically should only be used when referring to a true charcoal recessive and beige cross. Champagne is an incorrect term for this color as it is used for the Lowe recessive white/goldbar mutation.


Common "flaws" in tan animals are usually reddish/copper/orange oxidized fur, castiness, loose fur or poor fur density, incomplete coloration to the belly if the animal is the lightest shade of tan, and unsatisfactory size and conformation. Due to the ebony influence, tan can be a tricky color to breed for. Great ways to combat these flaws would be to breed tan animals to exceptional quality dark standard ebony carriers or beige ebony carrier animals. Quality tan animals should be large and blocky, with dense fur that does not lay down and bounces back when interrupted while the fur coloration has a clear lavender/tan hue. The bellies of these animals should always be beige to chocolate brown with little to no oxidation.


The tan (both hetero and homo) can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. 

To achieve the homo tan coloration, exceptional quality beiges x tans should be bred together to give their offspring two copies of the Tower beige gene.


All Images By: Sunshine Chinchillas

​TOV Ebony - Ebony Black Velvet

This mutation consists of the ebony gene and the Gunning black velvet gene. Since the Gunning black gene cannot exist in the homozygous state, TOV ebonies are always considered heterozygous. It is very difficult to visualize its characteristics due to its shading as most are a very dark black shade. This color will typically have the same coloration pattern as black velvet, but with grey to black sides and bellies. They also will have black eyes and dark ears. The only way to ensure an ebony has the TOV gene is a combination of lineage, visible coloration and breeding the animal. Pedigreed animals that have ebony within their lineage but appear black velvet should be listed as “black velvet ebony carrier or ebc.” This is to inform other breeders that the ebony gene can show up in future offspring if this animal is bred. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Gunning black gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A TOV to TOV mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

Common "flaws" in TOV ebony animals are usually reddish or oxidized fur, castiness, loose fur or poor fur density, incomplete coloration to the belly if the animal is the lightest shade of TOV ebony, resembling a black velvet with a "dirty" belly, and unsatisfactory size and conformation. Great ways to combat these flaws would be to breed TOV ebony animals to exceptional quality dark standard ebony carriers or ebony animals. Quality TOV ebony animals should be large and blocky, with dense fur that does not lay down and bounces back when interrupted while the fur coloration has a clear blue hue. The bellies of these animals should always be grey to black with little to no oxidation. 

The TOV ebony can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another TOV animal.

Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Recessive Mutations

Sapphire – Larsen Sapphire

First born on an Indiana ranch to Merle Larsen in 1963, this recessive mutation is a coloration that requires two parents with the gene to express it in their offspring; therefore, it is homozygous for the Larsen sapphire gene. This mutation should have a light blueish hue to its grey coat, often referred to as “gun metal” blue. The belly should be bright white, the eyes black, and the ears will be pink.

Common "flaws" in this mutation are oxidation, small size, or fur that wants to lay down rather than stand up. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed sapphires back to large, blocky light standard sc animals with dense fur to increase fur strength. A high quality sapphire should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a gun metal blue hue to its grey coat. 

The Larsen Sapphire can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although sapphire can technically be bred back to sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either two standard sapphire carrier parents, or a sapphire and a standard sapphire carrier parent breeding is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.

Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

White Sapphire – Mosaic Sapphire

This mutation contains both the Wilson white and Larsen sapphire genes; therefore, it is homozygous for the Larsen sapphire gene. The Wilson white gene can only exist in the heterozygous state, this is why white animals are never bred to other white animals. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Wilson white gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A white to white mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. Thus, white sapphire animals are homozygous for the sapphire gene and heterozygous for the white gene. 

They can have many coat pattern variations due to the condition called “mosaicism.” This causes certain cells to contain this gene while other cells do not, allowing for the sapphire color to show through in some areas. This means that areas containing the Wilson white gene will have fur appearing white, while areas not containing this gene will appear to be the base color of the animal (in this case, sapphire). This creates an unpredictable and random pattern of coloration from chin to chin, proving impossible to breed for specific markings. This color can be any pattern of white; all white, mostly white, frosted sapphire, mostly sapphire, or unique unusual shapes, patterns and splotches of sapphire throughout the coat. White sapphires will have black eyes and pink ears, like the Larsen sapphire. 

Common "flaws" white animals are prone to when not bred properly can be a "cottony" fur texture meaning their fur is more wiry, kinky, swirly or "singy." Other imperfections can be a yellowing or creaminess in coloration, loose/soft fur that does not stand on its own, and small size. To combat this, these animals should be bred to large, blocky light standard sc animals with smooth dense fur. Quality white sapphire animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture and good clarity of color without lacking in size.


The white sapphire can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another animal with the Wilson white gene. Although white sapphire can technically be bred back to sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a mosaic sapphire carrier to a standard sapphire carrier, or a white sapphire to a standard sapphire carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


Image belongs to Chinchillas.com:

http://chinchillas.com/

Beige Sapphire

This mutation contains both the Tower beige and Larsen sapphire genes; therefore, it is homozygous for the Larsen sapphire gene. Beige sapphires that have one copy of the beige gene are considered heterozygous for beige, while those who inherited two beige genes are considered homozygous for beige. The color itself is a very silvery hue of beige due to the gun metal effect that sapphire has; this color has a very soft and hazy, pastel tone. This color should have a bright white belly, red eyes, and pink ears. Animals that are homozygous beige sapphire will be a brighter shade of silvery beige and very bright red eyes, this may be difficult to distinguish as beige sapphires are already a very bright shade. Another very distinguishable factor of the beige sapphire is its bright red, patterned eyes. The eyes have patches of dark red amongst a mainly bright red eye, giving off an almost neon effect.


Common "flaws" in this mutation are oxidation, small size, or fur that wants to lay down rather than stand up. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed beige sapphires back to large, blocky light standard sc or beige sc animals with dense straight fur to avoid darkening the fur while increasing its fur strength. A high quality beige sapphire should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a gun metal blue tint to its beige coat.


The beige sapphire (both hetero and homo) can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although beige sapphire can technically be bred back to sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a beige sapphire carrier to a standard sapphire carrier, or a beige sapphire to a standard sapphire carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color. To achieve the homo beige sapphire coloration, exceptional quality beige sc x beige sapphires should be bred together to give their offspring two copies of the Tower beige gene.


Both Images belong to Sunset Chinchillas:

https://www.sunsetchinchillas.com/

TOV Sapphire – Sapphire Royale

This mutation consists of the Larsen sapphire gene and the Gunning black velvet gene; therefore, it is homozygous for the Larsen sapphire gene. Since the Gunning black gene cannot exist in the homozygous state, these animals are always considered heterozygous for TOV. This color will have an evenly veiled shade of dark gun metal grey across the face, head, neck, shoulders, back and hips. This dark sapphire grey then fades to sapphire further down the sides. This color should have a bright white belly, black eyes, and pink ears like a Larsen sapphire. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Gunning black gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A TOV to TOV mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

Common "flaws" in this mutation are a dull grey hue rather than a gun metal blue shade, small size, and lay down fur. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed TOV sapphires back to large, blocky dark standards with good clarity of color to avoid dulling the blue tones in the fur. A high quality TOV sapphire should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a gun metal blue hue to his grey coat that is darker around the face, head, neck, shoulders and back.

The TOV sapphire can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another TOV animal. Although TOV sapphire can technically be bred back to sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a black velvet sapphire carrier to a standard sapphire carrier, a black velvet sapphire carrier to a sapphire, or a TOV sapphire to a standard sapphire carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Sapphire Wrap

This mutation consists of the ebony gene and the recessive Larson sapphire gene; therefore, it is homozygous for the Larsen sapphire gene. Due to the ebony genes cumulative nature, the shading and darkness of each sapphire wrap varies. This color can range from light gun metal grey, medium blue grey, dark blue gray, and very dark blue grey. The ebony gene gives a wrapping effect to the belly, which can make it a sapphire to dark blue grey color depending on the shade of sapphire wrap. This color will have dark eyes and pink ears like a Larson sapphire. Pedigreed animals that have ebony within their lineage but appear sapphire should be listed as “sapphire ebony carrier or ebc.” This is to inform other breeders that the ebony gene can show up in future offspring if this animal is bred.

Common "flaws" in this mutation are oxidation, small size, or lay down fur. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed sapphire or sapphire wraps back to large, blocky ebony sc or standard ebc sc with good fur strength and good clarity of color to avoid ruining the gun metal blue tones in the fur. A high quality sapphire wrap should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a gun metal blue hue to its grey coat that can vary in darkness. The bellies of these animals should always be sapphire to deep sapphire with little to no oxidation.

The sapphire wrap can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although ebony sapphire can technically be bred back to sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either an ebony sapphire carrier to a standard ebony carrier sapphire carrier, or a sapphire wrap to a standard ebony carrier sapphire carrier parent breeding is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


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Violet – Sullivan Violet – Afro Violet

First spotted in 1975 on a Rhodesian (located in South Africa) ranch, Lloyd Sullivan subsequently purchased a herd of these animals and began to develop the color. This recessive mutation is a coloration that requires two parents with the gene to express it in their offspring; therefore, this color is homozygous for the Sullivan violet gene. This mutation should have a light blueish violet hue to its grey coat. The belly should be bright white, the eyes black, and the ears will be light grey to a slightly pinkish grey. 

Common "flaws" in this mutation are a brown or chocolate grey hue rather than a true violet shade, small size, kinky fur tips, singy (not straight) fur, or fur that wants to lay down rather than stand up. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed violets back to large, blocky light standard vc with dense straight fur to avoid the dark brown/chocolate hue that can ruin the purple tones in the fur while increasing its fur strength. A high quality violet should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a purple violet hue to its grey coat. 

The Sullivan violet can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although violet can technically be bred back to violet animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a standard violet carrier to a standard violet carrier, or a violet to a standard violet carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

White Violet – Mosaic Violet

This mutation contains both the Wilson white and Sullivan violet genes; therefore, it is homozygous for the Sullivan violet gene. The Wilson white gene can only exist in the heterozygous state, this is why white animals are never bred to other white animals. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Wilson white gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A white to white mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. Thus, white violet animals are homozygous for the violet gene and heterozygous for the white gene. 

They can have many coat pattern variations due to the condition called “mosaicism.” This causes certain cells to contain this gene while other cells do not, allowing for the violet color to show through in some areas. This means that areas containing the Wilson white gene will have fur appearing white, while areas not containing this gene will appear to be the base color of the animal (in this case, violet). This creates an unpredictable and random pattern of coloration from chin to chin, proving impossible to breed for specific markings. This color can be any pattern of white; all white, mostly white, frosted violet, mostly violet, or unique unusual shapes, patterns and splotches of violet throughout the coat. White violets will have black eyes and grey to pinkish grey ears, like the Sullivan violet. 

Common "flaws" white animals are prone to when not bred properly can be a "cottony" fur texture meaning their fur is more wiry, kinky, swirly or "singy." Other imperfections can be a yellowing or creaminess in coloration, loose/soft fur that does not stand on its own, and small size. To combat this, these animals should be bred to large, blocky light standard vc with smooth dense fur. Quality white violet animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture and good clarity of color without lacking in size.


The white violet can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another animal with the Wilson white gene. Although white violet can technically be bred back to violet animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The proper way to achieve this mutation is through a mosaic violet carrier to standard violet carrier, or white violet to standard violet carrier.


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Beige Violet – Pearl Beige

This mutation contains both the Tower beige and Sullivan violet genes; therefore, it is homozygous for the Sullivan violet gene. Beige violets that have one copy of the beige gene are considered heterozygous for beige, while those who inherited two beige genes are considered homozygous for beige. The color itself is a very pinkish hue of beige that has a soft and hazy, pastel tone. This color should have a bright white belly, red eyes, and pink ears. Animals that are homozygous beige violet will be a brighter shade of pearly beige with very bright red eyes, this may be difficult to distinguish as beige violets are already a very bright shade.

Common "flaws" in this mutation are oxidation, small size, kinky fur tips, singy (not straight) fur, or fur that wants to lay down rather than stand up. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed beige violets back to large, blocky light standard vc or beige vc with dense straight fur to avoid the darkening the beige hue while increasing its fur strength. A high quality beige violet should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a purple violet hue to its beige coat. 

The beige violet (both hetero and homo) can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although beige violet can technically be bred back to violet animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The proper way to achieve this mutation is through a beige violet carrier to standard violet carrier, or beige violet to standard violet carrier. To achieve the homo beige violet coloration, exceptional quality beige vc x beige violets should be bred together to give their offspring two copies of the Tower beige gene.


Image by: Sunshine Chinchillas

TOV Violet – Ultra Violet

This mutation consists of the Sullivan violet gene and the Gunning black velvet gene; therefore, it is homozygous for the Sullivan violet gene. Since the Gunning black gene cannot exist in the homozygous state, these animals are always considered heterozygous for TOV. This color will have an evenly veiled shade of dark violet grey across the face, head, neck, shoulders, back and hips. This dark violet grey then fades to violet further down the sides. This color should have a bright white belly, black eyes, and grey to pinkish grey ears like a Sullivan violet. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Gunning black gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A TOV to TOV mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

Common "flaws" in this mutation are a brown or chocolate grey hue rather than a true violet shade, small size, kinky fur tips, or singy (not straight) fur. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed TOV violets back to large, blocky dark standard vc with good clarity of color to avoid the dark brown/chocolate hue that can ruin the purple tones in the fur. A high quality TOV violet should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a purple violet hue to his grey coat that is darker around the face, head, neck, shoulders and back . 

The TOV violet can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another TOV animal. Although TOV violet can technically be bred back to violet animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a black velvet violet carrier to a standard violet carrier, a black velvet violet carrier to a violet, or a TOV violet to a standard violet carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


Image By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Violet Wrap

This mutation consists of the ebony gene and the recessive Sullivan violet gene; therefore, it is homozygous for the Sullivan violet gene. Due to the ebony genes cumulative nature, the shading and darkness of each violet wrap varies. This color can range from light violet grey, medium violet grey, dark violet gray, and very dark violet grey. The ebony gene gives a wrapping effect to the belly, which can make it a violet to dark violet grey color depending on the shade of violet wrap. This color will have dark eyes and grey to pinkish grey ears like a Sullivan violet. Pedigreed animals that have ebony within their lineage but appear violet should be listed as “violet ebony carrier or ebc.” This is to inform other breeders that the ebony gene can show up in future offspring if this animal is bred. 

Common "flaws" in this mutation are a brown or chocolate grey hue rather than a true violet shade, small size, kinky fur tips, singy (not straight) fur, or lay down fur. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed violet or violet wraps back to large, blocky ebony vc or standard ebc vc with good fur strength and good clarity of color to avoid the dark brown/chocolate hue that can ruin the purple tones in the fur. A high quality violet wrap should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a purple violet hue to its grey coat that can vary in darkness. The bellies of these animals should always be violet to deep violet with little to no oxidation.


The violet wrap can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although ebony violet can technically be bred back to violet animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The proper way to achieve this mutation is through an ebony violet carrier to a standard ebony carrier violet carrier, or a violet wrap to a standard ebony carrier violet carrier.


Image belongs to Chinaholic:

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German Violet – Deutsch Violet

Originally bred in the 1970's and 80's, this coloration was not officially recognized as a distinct mutation until later. Rolf Haupt of Frankfurt, Germany was the first breeder of this color. Similar to the Sullivan violet, this color is also recessive. It is darker in coloring and has a more chocolate hued grey compared to the Sullivan violet. It should have a bright white belly, dark eyes, and grey ears. This color is more commonly bred in Europe. In these images, this animal shows a deep chocolate-grey hue compared to the lavender tones of the Sullivan violets earlier on in this page.


The German violet and Sullivan Afro Violet are not the same mutation, they are genetically distinct from each other although they look very similar. Thus, these two recessives can be combined, creating the double violet. This means that an animal is homozygous for the German violet gene and the Sullivan violet gene simultaneously. This color will look very similar to the German and Sullivan violets, combining both the chocolate and lavender tones of each mutation. This could be accomplished in one of several ways; examples include breeding two standard greys carrying the Sullivan violet and German violet genes (standard vc gvc), breeding a Sullivan violet German Violet carrier (violet gvc) to a standard vc gvc, breeding a German violet Sullivan violet carrier (German violet vc) to a standard vc gvc, or breeding a German violet vc to a Sullivan violet gvc.


The German violet can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although German violet can technically be bred back to German violet animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The proper way to achieve this mutation is through a standard German violet carrier to a standard German violet carrier, or a German violet to a standard German violet carrier.


Both Images belong to Black Dream Chinchillas:

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For more German Violet Information, visit ED Chinchillas:

http://www.edchinchillas.co.uk/Mutations/Dviolet.html

Blue Diamond – Sapphire Violet - Viophire

This recessive mutation is a coloration that requires two parents that each carry the Larsen sapphire and Sullivan Violet gene; therefore, it is homozygous for both the Larsen sapphire gene and the Sullivan violet gene. This mutation should have a bright periwinkle grey hue or a deep greyish blue violet coloration. The belly should be bright white, the eyes black, and the ears will be greyish pink. 

It is important to remember that a sapphire carrier violet carrier (vc sc) is the same as a blue diamond carrier (bdc). The term blue diamond carrier just means the animal carries the violet gene and the sapphire gene simultaneously. The bdc term is used as an easier way for breeders to indicate this to other breeders. 

Common "flaws" the blue diamond can have include lack of conformation and fur density. Since this color is a double recessive, the utmost care must be used to ensure a quality animal is produced. A quality blue diamond should have bright, dense fur with a blocky build, and a white belly. To achieve this, blue diamond animals should always be bred back to high quality, large and densely furred light standard bdc animals.


The blue diamond can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although blue diamond can technically be bred back to violet and sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive (especially a double recessive) can greatly diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a standard blue diamond carrier (also called sapphire violet carrier or bd carrier) to a standard blue diamond carrier, a sapphire violet carrier to a standard blue diamond carrier, a violet sapphire carrier to a standard blue diamond carrier, or a blue diamond to a standard blue diamond carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


Image belongs to Sunset Chinchillas:

https://www.sunsetchinchillas.com/

White Diamond - Mosaic Blue Diamond - White Viophire

The white diamond, or white blue diamond, is a blue diamond animal that carries the Wilson white gene. This means that this mutation contains the Wilson white gene while simultaneously being homozygous for the Larsen sapphire and Sullivan violet genes. The Wilson white gene can only exist in the heterozygous state, this is why white animals are never bred to other white animals. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Wilson white gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A white to white mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. Thus, white diamond animals are homozygous for the violet and sapphire genes and heterozygous for the white gene. 

Since they have the Wilson white gene, this can cause unpredictable coat patterns and variations due to the condition called “mosaicism.” This causes certain cells to contain this gene while other cells do not, allowing for the blue diamond color to show through in some areas. This means that areas containing the Wilson white gene will have fur appearing white, while areas not containing this gene will appear to be the base color of the animal (in this case, blue diamond). This creates an unpredictable and random pattern of coloration from chin to chin, proving impossible to breed for specific markings. This color can be any pattern of white; all white, mostly white, frosted blue diamond, mostly blue diamond, or unique unusual shapes, patterns and splotches of blue diamond throughout the coat. White diamonds will have black eyes and greyish-pink ears, like the blue diamond. 

Common "flaws" white animals are prone to when not bred properly can be a "cottony" fur texture meaning their fur is more wiry, kinky, swirly or "singy." Other imperfections can be a yellowing or creaminess in coloration, loose/soft fur that does not stand on its own, and small size. To combat this, white diamonds should be bred to large, blocky light standard bdc with smooth dense fur. Quality white diamond animals should be large and blocky with a smooth fur texture and good clarity of color without lacking in size.


The white diamond can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another animal with the Wilson white gene. Although white diamond can technically be bred back to violet and sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive (especially a double recessive) can greatly diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. There are several ways to breed for this coloration; the best methods would be to breed a mosaic blue diamond carrier to a standard blue diamond carrier, or a white diamond to a standard blue diamond carrier.


Image belongs to Sunset Chinchillas:

https://www.sunsetchinchillas.com/

Beige Diamond - Beige Blue Diamond - Beige Viophire

This mutation contains the Tower beige, Sullivan violet and Larsen sapphire genes; therefore, it is homozygous for the Sullivan violet and Larsen sapphire gene. Beige diamonds that have one copy of the beige gene are considered heterozygous for beige, while those who inherited two beige genes are considered homozygous for beige. The color itself is a combination of both the silvery hues of the beige sapphire and the pinkish hues of the beige violet, thus creating a very pastel bright beige. This color should have a bright white belly and pinkish grey ears. The eyes of these animals are very similar to that of the beige sapphire; both mutations have very bright red eyes with dark patches scattered throughout the iris. Animals that are homozygous beige diamond will be a brighter shade of pastel beige with very bright red eyes, this may be difficult to distinguish as beige diamond are already a very light shade.


Common "flaws" in this mutation are oxidation, small size, kinky fur tips, singy (not straight) fur, or fur that wants to lay down rather than stand up. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed beige diamonds back to large, blocky, lightly veiled beige bdc or standard bdc animals with dense straight fur. A high quality beige diamond should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a pastel beige hue to its coat.


The beige diamond (both hetero and homo) can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although beige diamond can technically be bred back to violet and sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive (especially a double recessive) can greatly diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The way to create this mutation can be achieved in several ways; some of those being via a beige blue diamond carrier to a standard blue diamond carrier, a beige diamond to a standard blue diamond carrier, or a blue diamond to a beige blue diamond carrier. Other ways include a beige violet sc to a standard bdc; or a beige sapphire vc to standard bdc. To achieve the homo beige diamond coloration, exceptional quality beige bdc x beige diamonds should be bred together to give their offspring two copies of the Tower beige gene.


Both Images belong to Happy Chin:

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TOV Blue Diamond - TOV Sapphire Violet - TOV Viophire

This mutation consists of the Larsen sapphire gene, Sullivan violet gene and the Gunning black velvet gene; therefore, it is homozygous for both the Larsen sapphire gene and the Sullivan violet gene. Since the Gunning black gene cannot exist in the homozygous state, these animals are always considered heterozygous for TOV. This color will have an evenly veiled shade of deep periwinkle blue across the face, head, neck, shoulders, back and hips. This deep periwinkle shade then fades to the regular blue diamond color further down the sides. This color should have a bright white belly, black eyes, and greyish pink ears. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Gunning black gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A TOV to TOV mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

Common "flaws" the TOV blue diamond can have include lack of conformation and fur density. Since this color is a double recessive, the utmost care must be used to ensure a quality animal is produced. A quality TOV blue diamond should have dark veiling, dense fur with a blocky build, and a white belly. To achieve this, TOV blue diamond animals should always be bred back to high quality, large and densely furred light standard bdc animals.


The TOV blue diamond can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another TOV animal. Although TOV blue diamond can technically be bred back to violet and sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive (especially a double recessive) can greatly diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The way to create this mutation can be achieved in several ways; some of those being via a black velvet blue diamond carrier to a standard blue diamond carrier, a TOV blue diamond to a standard blue diamond carrier, or a blue diamond to a black velvet blue diamond carrier. Some other ways include a TOV violet sc to a standard bdc; or a TOV sapphire vc to standard bdc.


Image belongs to Sunset Chinchillas:

https://www.sunsetchinchillas.com/

Blue Diamond Wrap

This mutation consists of the ebony gene, the recessive Larson sapphire and the recessive Sullivan violet genes; therefore, it is homozygous for the Larsen sapphire and Sullivan violet genes. Due to the ebony genes cumulative nature, the shading and darkness of each blue diamond wrap varies. This color can range from light periwinkle grey, medium blue-purple grey, dark blue-purple gray, and very dark blue-purple grey. The ebony gene gives a wrapping effect to the belly, which can make it a blue diamond to dark blue diamond grey color depending on the shade of wrap. This color will have dark eyes and greyish-pink ears like a blue diamond. Pedigreed animals that have ebony within their lineage but appear blue diamond should be listed as “blue diamond ebony carrier or ebc.” This is to inform other breeders that the ebony gene can show up in future offspring if this animal is bred. 

Common "flaws" in this mutation are oxidation, small size, or lay down fur. To combat these flaws, it is best to breed blue diamond wraps back to large, blocky ebony bdc or ebony carrier bdc with good fur strength and good clarity of color to avoid ruining the blue-purple tones in the fur. A high quality blue diamond wrap should be large and blocky with dense, smooth fur and a bright periwinkle hue to its grey coat that can vary in darkness. The bellies of these animals should always be the blue diamond to deep blue diamond with little to no oxidation.


The blue diamond wrap can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although ebony blue diamond can technically be bred back to violet and sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive (especially a double recessive) can greatly diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The way to create this mutation can be achieved in several ways; some of those being via a standard ebony carrier blue diamond carrier to a standard ebony carrier blue diamond carrier, a blue diamond wrap to a standard ebony carrier blue diamond carrier, or a blue diamond to a standard ebony carrier blue diamond carrier. Some other ways include a violet wrap sc to a standard bdc; or a sapphire wrap vc to standard bdc.


Image belongs to Sunset Chinchillas:

https://www.sunsetchinchillas.com/

Triple Blue Diamond - Triple Diamond - Triple Viophire

This mutation is probably one of the most difficult colors to breed for. Reason being, there are three recessive mutations that create this beautiful bright cool shade; the Larsen sapphire, Sullivan violet, and German violet genetics. The color should have a rich vivid periwinkle sheen with a white belly, black eyes and pinkish-grey ears. This color looks very similar to it's double recessive counterpart, the blue diamond. Knowing the genetics, history, and coloration/darkness of veiling in the parents is the best way to determine if it is a true triple diamond. It is thought that some of the blue diamonds in the U.S. may actually be triple diamonds. This can be observed in the variations of coloration, some blue diamonds are more of a bright periwinkle whereas others may be more of a deep periwinkle. 

This is tricky to breed for as typically show quality characteristics are lost when adding more mutation genetics to the mix of a breeding line. Thus it is so important to breed back to standard grey to keep the density/quality of the fur and body conformation intact. The best way to achieve this coloration would be to breed two standard triple blue diamond carriers together, or a triple blue diamond to a standard triple blue diamond carrier. A triple diamond carrier would have to carry the Larsen sapphire, Sullivan violet, and the German violet genes. Only the most experienced breeders with the highest quality stock should attempt to breed for this mutation.

The triple blue diamond can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although the triple blue diamond can technically be bred back to violet, German violet, and sapphire animals as there is no lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive (especially a triple recessive) can greatly diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged.


Image belongs to Silversklippan's Chinchillas:

www.silverklippan.se

Lowe Recessive White – LRW – Goldbar – Champagne

This newer recessive mutation is a coloration that requires two parents with the gene to express it in their offspring; therefore, it is homozygous for the LRW/Goldbar gene. This coloration first appeared on Royal Oakes Ranch in Jamul, California to Bob and June Baar in 1995. This would be the first of the American lines of Goldbar to appear. The first of the Canadian version of this coloration was a Lowe recessive white kit born in 2002 to Robert Lowe's herd in Enderby, B.C., Canada. This mutation should have a white coat with a light champagne or gold hue. This golden hue will be a darker bar along the animals back, thus the name “Goldbar.” This color should have a white belly, red eyes, and pink ears. Most breeders prefer to differentiate between the Canadian LRW, a lighter golden hue, and the American Goldbar, a more yellow golden hue, to preserve their genetics as each have their own unique qualities. Contrary to popular belief, the correct spelling for the Goldbar is with one A, not two (Goldbaar).


The Lowe recessive white/goldbar mutation is not related to the Wilson white gene, but could possibly be a recessive beige variant. Therefore, this color is not technically a true white. This is also evidenced in some animals by the presence of a faint visible demarcation line separating the white belly from the coat. Since this color is not a true white, there has been no evidence of a lethal factor when breeding LRW/goldbar to LRW/goldbar. Although, this is discouraged as breeding recessive to recessive does not improve the quality of the offspring.


Common "flaws" for the LRW/Goldbar are an undesirable yellow discoloration rather than a glowing golden hue, a "wedgy" appearance or poor conformation, and a lack of fur density. A quality LRW can be achieved by breeding the mutation to a dense, blocky light standard LRWc or beige LRWc, whereas, a quality Goldbar can be achieved by breeding the mutation to a dense, blocky dark standard gbc. Although both LRW and Goldbars are the same mutation, each originated from different herds thus they can have varying degrees of what is considered to be an exceptional example of the color based on differing opinions. Some prefer a lighter, golden animal who resembles a bright white animal. Others prefer a deeper golden hue to set the American Goldbar apart from its Canadian counterparts. Both the Canadian LRW and American Goldbar should have a golden hue without oxidation, dense fur that does not lay down, and a large, blocky body type.


The Lowe recessive white, or goldbar, can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although, the common mutes to cross with goldbar/LRW are beige and black velvet. Thus, its very unlikely to come across a goldbar wrap, goldbar black pearl, goldbar sapphire etc. Although goldbar/LRW can technically be bred back to goldbar/LRW animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a standard LRW carrier (or gbc) to a standard LRW carrier (or gbc), or LRW (or goldbar) to a standard LRW carrier (or gbc) is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


First image belongs to RDZC Ranch:

http://www.rdzcranch.com/


Second image by: Sunshine Chinchillas

TOV Lowe Recessive White – TOV Goldbar – TOV Champagne

This recessive mutation is a coloration that requires two parents with the gene to express it in their offspring; therefore, it is homozygous for the LRW/Goldbar gene. Since the Gunning black gene cannot exist in the homozygous state, these animals are always considered heterozygous for TOV. This mutation should have a white coat with a light champagne or gold hue to them, some animals can almost appear to have a pink hue. This golden hue will be a darker bar along the animals back, thus the name “Goldbar.” TOV animals will have a slight darkening of the golden color along the back, hips, neck, head and face. This color should have a white belly, red eyes, and pink ears. As with any TOV, these animals will have the darker "mask" look to their faces. This coloration can be very faint and hard to see, thus breeding the animal and analyzing pedigree information is the most effective way to prove if a LRW/Goldbar is a TOV. Pregnancies with kits containing two copies (also known as homozygous) of the Gunning black gene are typically not viable and are reabsorbed. A TOV to TOV mating can occur with viable kits, but this breeding is discouraged as it can diminish the quality of offspring. 

Common "flaws" for the TOW LRW/Goldbar are an undesirable yellow discoloration rather than a glowing golden hue, a "wedgy" appearance or poor conformation, and a lack of fur density. A quality TOV LRW/Goldbar can be achieved by breeding the mutation to a dense, blocky black velvet LRWc (or gbc); darkness of golden veiling can be controlled by how dark the black velvet's veiling is that it is bred to. The TOV LRW/Goldbar should have a golden hue without oxidation, dense fur that does not lay down, and a large, blocky body type.


The TOV LRW/Goldbar can be crossed with most of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. It should not be bred back to another TOV animal. Although TOV goldbar/TOV LRW can technically be bred back to goldbar/LRW animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The proper way to achieve this mutation is through a black velvet LRWc (or gbc) to a standard LRWc (or gbc), a black velvet LRWc (or gbc) to a LRW (or goldbar), or a TOV LRW (or TOV goldbar) to a standard LRWc (or gbc).


Image belongs to Silversklippan's Chinchillas:

www.silverklippan.se

Black Pearl – The Polish Black Pearl

First appearing on the ranch of Elzbieta Kucharczak of Poland in 2007, this newer recessive mutation is a coloration that requires two parents with the gene to express it in their offspring; therefore, it is homozygous for the Polish black pearl gene. This mutation is not a variation of black velvet or ebony. It is actually a variation of the standard coat color; no TOV, black velvet, or ebony genes are present in this coloration. Rather than having grey sides on the coat like standard grey, they are all black. The head, neck, shoulders, back, hips, sides, feet and tail are black. An easy way to tell the difference between a black pearl and a black velvet would be to look at the ears and veiling. Black pearls do not have a white ring or "halo" around the ears or neck like some black velvets do; a black pearl's fur around their ears will be the same shade of black as their coat. Black Pearls also have unique tail coloration; rather than having various shades of black, grey and white tail hairs, they have strictly only black long tail hairs with short white hairs closer to the skin (example photo pictured). This color should have a bright white belly, black eyes, and dark ears. Due to it being a new mutation, the show standard for this color is still in development as there are a limited number of exceptional quality black pearls in the United States. Many black pearls still need improvement in size and veiling; they also require work regarding belly coloration.


Common "flaws" the black pearl can have include "creamy" or "dirty" bellies, lack of fur density, lack of size and conformation, and reddish oxidation. A quality black pearl should have a stark contrast between the black and white fur, with minimal to no gradient between the two. They should also have a bright white belly with dense black fur that shines blue under show lights, fur that stands up and bounces back if interrupted, and a large, blocky body shape. To combat these flaws, very large, densely furred and darkly veiled standard black pearl carriers with bright white bellies should be used to breed with these animals.


The Polish black pearl can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although, the common mutes to cross with black pearl are just beige currently. Thus, its very unlikely to come across a black pearl wrap, black pearl goldbar, black pearl sapphire etc. Although black pearl can technically be bred back to black pearl animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a standard black pearl carrier to a standard black pearl carrier, or a black pearl to a standard black pearl carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


First Image belongs to Daniela Klein:

zuchtinfo.igc-forum.de/index.php?goto=./content//22_Mutation%20rezessive&sub=2_Black%20Pearls.htm


Second Image belongs to: Sunshine Chinchillas

Brown Pearl – Beige Black Pearl - Heterozygous Brown Pearl - Homozygous Brown Pearl

This recessive mutation is a coloration that requires two parents with the gene to express it in their offspring; therefore, it is homozygous for the Polish black pearl gene. It also is combined with the Tower Beige gene. This mutation is not a variation of brown velvet or tan. It is a variation of the black pearl mutation and the Tower beige gene; no TOV, black velvet, or ebony genes are present in this coloration. An easy way to tell the difference between a brown pearl and a brown velvet would be to look at the ears and veiling. Brown pearls do not have a light ring or "halo" around the ears and neck like some brown velvets do; a brown pearl's fur around their ears will be the same shade of brown as their coat. The head, neck, shoulders, back, hips, sides, feet and tail are all a deep chocolate brown. This color should have a bright white belly, red eyes, and pink ears.


Since the beige gene can exist in the homozygous state, homo brown pearls can be bred for. This would create a much lighter variant with bright red eyes and pink ears. One way that homo brown pearls can be created is by breeding a brown pearl to a beige black pearl carrier (bp). The first image is a regular brown pearl, the second image is a homo brown pearl.


Common "flaws" the brown pearl can have include "creamy" or "dirty" bellies, lack of fur density, lack of size and conformation, and reddish/copper oxidation. A quality brown pearl should have a stark contrast between the chocolate brown fur and white belly, with minimal to no gradient between the two. They should also have a bright white belly with dense brown fur that shines deep chocolate lavender under show lights, fur that stands up and bounces back if interrupted, and a large, blocky body shape. Since this mutation is so new and the black pearl mutation it stems from struggles with these flaws as well, the utmost care should be taken when breeding this mutation. To combat these flaws, very large, densely furred and darkly veiled standard bpc or beige bpc with bright white bellies should be used to breed with these animals.


The brown pearl (both hetero and homo) can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although brown pearl can technically be bred back to black pearl animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a beige black pearl carrier to a standard black pearl carrier, a black pearl to a beige black pearl carrier, or a brown pearl to a standard black pearl carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color. To achieve the homo brown pearl coloration, exceptional quality beige bpc x beige bpc should be bred together to give their offspring two copies of the Tower beige gene.


First Image belongs to Silversklippan's Chinchillas:

www.silverklippan.se


Second Image belongs to Betina's Chinchillas:

http://www.facebook.com/Betinas-Chinchilla

Coat Type Mutations

Coat Types

Royal Persian Angora

First examples of angora were recorded in the 1960's by Dr. Caraway on a ranch in Ft. Worth, Texas. This coat type appears to be a recessive cumulative gene, with carriers exhibiting either normal fur or slightly longer fur. In the homozygous state, the angora’s fur will be much longer and plushier than a normal chinchilla coat. Coat length can vary depending on its location, some areas such as the rear, can be up to 2 or 3 inches long. Angoras typically have an eye-catching head shape as well, unique from its non-RPA counterparts. RPA chinchillas can come in a variety of colors, this gene can be crossed over to any mutation. Common colors include standard grey, beige, mosaic, pink white, black velvet, ebony, tan, violet, sapphire, etc.


Common "flaws" for this mutation vary based on color, each color has its own different imperfections that must be bred out based on the individual color mutation. As a whole, the Royal Persian Angora or RPA animals typically need size, conformation and fur density. To achieve this, RPAs should always be bred with animals that are strong in size, conformation and fur density. RPAs should only be bred to the highest of quality as the mutation is currently vulnerable to weaker qualities, leading to small, wedgy animals with loose fur. An exceptional RPA animal will have good size and conformation, fur density, fur length, veiling and clarity of color regardless of mutation.


The Royal Persian angora can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although full angoras can technically be bred back to full angora animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The best way to achieve an exceptional example of RPA is to breed high quality angora carriers to angora carriers, or angoras to angora carriers.


For more information on the history of Angoras, check out this link:

http://www.chinchillas.com/newsletter/Royal-Persian-Angora-Chinchilla-Press-Release.htm


First Image belongs to RDZC Ranch:

http://www.rdzcranch.com/


Second Image by: Sunshine Chinchillas


Third Image belongs to ABC Chinchillas:

http://www.abcchinchillas.com/

Locken or Curly

Jim Ritterspach and Tamara Tucker originally imported curlies from Germany to the U.S. in 2007. These lines were then split between them and bred, leading to the curly chinchillas we see in America today. This coat type appears to be a recessive cumulative gene, with carriers exhibiting either normal fur or slightly curly fur. In the homozygous state, the locken’s fur will be much curlier and wavier than a normal chinchilla coat. Coat curl can vary from chin to chin. The locken gene is closely linked to the ebony gene as an animal cannot express curl without the ebony gene present. Therefore, all lockens will be a variation of the ebony coat color. Lockens can come in any mutation variation as long as it contains this ebony gene; for example, ebony, tan, homo tan, white ebony, tan white, violet wrap, sapphire wrap, blue diamond wrap, TOV ebony, etc.


Common "flaws" for this mutation vary based on color, each color has its own different imperfections that must be bred out based on the individual color mutation. As a whole, the curly or Locken animals typically need size, conformation and fur density. To achieve this, curlies should always be bred with animals that are strong in size, conformation and fur density. To keep the curly genetic intact, it is also beneficial to always breed back to some form of ebony. However, this should be always be taken into careful consideration as ebony animals are known for lacking size and conformation if a sub-par line is chosen for breeding. Curlies/lockens should only be bred to the highest of quality as the mutation is currently very weak, leading to small, wedgy animals. An exceptional curly/locken animal will have good size and conformation, fur density, fur curl, veiling and clarity of color regardless of mutation.


The Locken can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although full lockens can technically be bred back to full locken animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The best way to achieve an exceptional example of Locken is to breed high quality Locken carriers to Locken carriers, or Lockens to Locken carriers.


For more information on Locken chinchillas, check out this link:

http://www.chinchillas.com/locken/about_the_locken_curly_chinchilla_mutation.htm


First Image belongs to ABC Chinchillas:

http://www.abcchinchillas.com/


Second and Third Images by: Sunshine Chinchillas

Imperial - Curlygora - Locken Royal Persian Angora

Imperials, or curlygoras, are animals that are homozygous for both the Royal Persian Angora and Locken (curly) genes. With both of these coat types appearing to behave in a cumulative recessive manner, it is best to use both Locken/RPA carriers and Lockens/RPAs to achieve this coat type. Just like regular RPAs, coat length can vary depending on its location, some areas such as the rear, can be up to 2 or 3 inches long. Angoras typically have an eye-catching head shape as well, unique from its non-RPA counterparts. When combined with the Locken gene, this longer fur exhibits varying degrees of curl or wave. The locken gene is closely linked to the ebony gene as an animal cannot express curl without the ebony gene present. Therefore, all imperials will be a variation of the ebony coat color. Imperials can come in any mutation variation as long as it also contains this ebony gene; for example, ebony, tan, homo tan, white ebony, tan white, violet wrap, sapphire wrap, blue diamond wrap, TOV ebony, etc.


Common "flaws" for this mutation vary based on color, each color has its own different imperfections that must be bred out based on the individual color mutation. Since the curlygora or Imperial is a double recessive, there can be more challenges with breeding this mutation. As a whole, the curlygora or imperial animals typically need size, conformation and fur density. To achieve this, they should always be bred with animals that are strong in size, conformation and fur density. To keep the curly genetic intact, it is also beneficial to always breed back to some form of ebony. However, this should be always be taken into careful consideration as ebony animals are known for lacking size and conformation if a sub-par line is chosen for breeding. Curlygoras/imperials should only be bred to the highest of quality as the mutation is currently very weak, leading to small, wedgy animals. An exceptional curlygora/imperial animal will have good size and conformation, fur density, fur curl/length ratio, veiling and clarity of color regardless of mutation.


The Imperial/curlygora can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. Although full curlygoras can technically be bred back to full curlygora animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. The best way to achieve an exceptional example of Imperial is to breed high quality curlygora carriers to curlygora carriers, or curlygoras to curlygora carriers.


Images belong to Chinchillas.com:

http://chinchillas.com/

The Genetic Makeup of Ebony - Charcoals

Over the years, many charcoal-like colors have been interbred, leading to the ebonies we know today. Thus, it can be tricky to breed for ebony as there are so many recessive, weakly dominant, and accumulative genetics at play. With no way to confirm what of these charcoal traits an animal carries, it can be tricky to produce exactly the coloration you are looking for. Thus, it is so important to become familiar with an ebony line while breeding it. Then one can have a slightly better chance of breeding for a specific tone, density and coloration of ebony.


Many charcoal-like colors were eventually mixed with the Tasco (ebony) over the decades, some of the known colors were the Recessive Charcoal, the Busse, the French Blue, the Lester Black Recessive and the Treadwell Black. Many of these charcoal strains were thought to be possibly related. However, over the years many of these were interbred, records were lost, and distinctions between the mutations were blurred. The only distinct charcoal strain that can still be found being bred separately from the ebony is the Brouke charcoal. 

Charcoal - Brouke Charcoal

This mutation is a true recessive ebony-like gene, working in a similar way to how the sapphire and violet are bred. It was founded on the Ranch of Betty Brouke of California in 1960. After being heavily bred into the ebony mutation we are familiar with here in the United States, pure charcoals are rare in the U.S. However, select breeders in the UK do continue to breed true charcoals. This color is similar to a light to medium shade of ebony; a grey charcoal color with a matching belly, black eyes, and dark ears. However, their coloration is a bit different as a true charcoal will be a matte grey tone all over rather than having shiny fur like the ebony mutation. Charcoals have a tendency to oxidize to a brown coloration and can be light, medium and dark in color. Animals with the charcoal gene typically have a slightly different fur texture, some have described it as feeling like cotton wool. This however, does not detract from their eye appeal. Charcoal carriers will look no different from a standard grey animal and will have a white belly, they may also have a slight cotton wool feel to their fur. 

The charcoal can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc. The most common mutes the charcoal is crossed with are the beige and black velvet. Charcoal beige crosses are referred to as pastels, charcoal black velvet crosses are referred to as charblack, and charcoal beige black velvet crosses are referred to as charbrown. Although charcoal can technically be bred back to charcoal animals as there is no known lethal factor, breeding recessive to recessive can diminish quality of offspring and is discouraged. Either a standard charcoal carrier to a standard charcoal carrier, or a charcoal to a standard charcoal carrier is the proper way to achieve a high-quality example of this color.


Image belongs to Davidson Chinchillas:

http://www.davidson-chinchillas.co.uk/pages/charcoal_chinchillas.php


The Tasco - Ebony

This coloration was developed on the ranch of Otto Munn of Texas in 1964. The mutation was then further pursued by George Alexander and Claude Smith of San Angelo, Texas. It was a dominant black or black-brown of the charcoal series and is what we refer to today as the ebony. The lightest Tasco looked like a dark standard grey with extra darkening and a bluish belly, while darker Tascos were very dark over all the pelt with a blue-gray or brown-gray belly, sometimes very dark. Qualities of this mutation were silkiness and cushion with a beautiful appearance of the fur. They typically had good size and density with a good eye appeal. The genetics of this coloration were interesting as they showed an accumulative factor, meaning that breeding tasco to tasco over several generations would lead to a darkening of coloration. This means that genetically, this would have been a weakly dominant or incomplete dominant with no lethal factor. At show, these animals were classified under the charcoal category.


The Busse

The Busse was a color founded in 1960s on the Angel Ranch. This color was similar to the charcoal in that it was thought to be recessive. Carrier animals were typically darker with a blue-black appearance and a blue-grey or blue-brown discoloration of the belly. In the homozygous state, the Busse was much darker with a similar belly to the charcoal. These animals were difficult to breed for as most would end up with a grey belly that could become discolored to a brown hue. This mutation was potentially related to the charcoal, although no definite research was performed to confirm this.


The French Blue

The French Blue was another charcoal-like mutation that when in the heterozygous state looked like a standard grey with a grey-bluish belly, but when homozygous was quite dark with a curly twist to the fur. This mutation was bred by Jack French of Kansas in 1970.


Lester Black Recessive

The recessive Lester Black was much darker than the Gunning black with a wavy texture to their fur and a black or black-grey belly. Carriers of the recessive black gene looked like normal standard grey animals with some extension of the veiling. This color was first seen at an ECBC National Show in Albuquerque, NM and was produced by M.W. Lester of Midwest City, Oklahoma in 1970. When examined under show lights, these animals showed a lavender tone that made them seem very bright. They were very dark, jet-black even. The bellies of this mutation had no brown discoloration, but rather had a blackish grey or blackish blue hue to it. They had great fur density but lacked fur strength, the fur was also quite long and had a tendency to lay down. These animals were classified as charcoal at shows, they were also bred into some charcoal populations to determine if the mutations were related.


The Treadwell Black

This mutation was founded in Ft. Worth, TX in 1962-63. This mutation was extremely similar to the Lester Black, with the exception that these animals were typically smaller with less dense fur. Not much is known as MCBA information regarding this color has since been lost.


Mahogany

The mahogany coloration is not confirmed to be its own mutation as it could potentially be a heavily oxidized ebony. Some breeders have said they've seen these animals and they look to be a different coat color than ebony. Although this is just speculation, the mahogany is described as a deep reddish brown hue all over the coat. Unfortunately, these animals are few and far between, leaving very little chance of researching the coloration.


More Information on Charcoal:

http://www.edchinchillas.co.uk/Mutations/Charcoal.html

http://www.chins-n-hedgies.com/threads/the-pure-recessive-charcoal-derivatives.577/

Uncommon Mutations

California White Tail - Fading White

The genetics behind this coat variation are not well known, it does not seem to act like a true recessive. More breeding and research is necessary to determine how this anomaly behaves. This can affect any coat color, causing them to appear to fade to white. The animals in the first photo is a violet female affected by this disorder, the animal in the second photo is a standard grey fading white. Some animals begin to fade around two to three years old, while others can start fading as young as three to six months according to some breeders outside of the U.S. Animals with this trait often begin to turn white around the ears, nose, and base of the tail that then extends outward, giving a mask and splotched effect. Some breeders choose not to breed this coloration as they are unsure if it is ethical to do so without knowing what causes the pigmentation loss. However, many breeders still do have success with their fading white lines and have seen no ill effects or health concerns. It is all up to the discretion of the breeder.


Some other names that this oddity has been described as are the California fading white, California recessive white, white tail, or the recessive fading white. Since this mutation is not proven to be recessive, the most correct names for it are the California white tail and fading white.


The fading white can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc.


First Image belongs to Sunset Chinchillas:

https://www.sunsetchinchillas.com/


Second Image belongs to Betina's Chinchillas:

http://www.facebook.com/Betinas-Chinchilla

Blue Slate

Uncommon in the U.S., the blue slate is still not yet proven to be its own mutation. Many breeders outside of the states classify it as its own coloration that is unrelated to the Gunning black velvet. However, for U.S. breeders, more clarification and breeding is needed to shed light on what genetics are at work for this color. Blue slates are very similar to the black velvet coloration; dark eyes, grey ears, white belly and dark veiling over the face, head and back. The key difference that most breeders of this color note is that the blue slate is considerably less veiled than a black velvet. The grey of the sides and face is much higher up on the animals coat while the black veiling does not extend very far down. This gives a halo effect to the animals eyes, face and neck. More breeding and research is required to prove this mutation to be unrelated to the Gunning black. 

The blue slate can be crossed with any of the known mutations; grey, beige, white, TOV, ebony, sapphire, violet, black pearl, goldbar, angora, locken, etc.


Image belongs to Cosmos Chinchillas:

https://www.cosmoschinchilla.com/blue-slate/

Potentially Extinct Mutations

Sullivan Recessive Beige

This beige color is different to the Tower beige as it was recessive and had weak fur with veiling that did not extend far. These animals had bright jellybean red eyes, lighter beige fur, pink ears, shorter fur, smaller size and would oxidize to an orange tone over time. Therefore, the Tower beige and the Sullivan beige are not the same color. Unfortunately, there are no verified recessive beige animals still in breeding today. Although there is speculation, there is no way to prove if its true due to the original Sullivan beiges not reproducing and eventually passing away.


Image and info on the Sullivan Beige can be found at Chinchillas Esperanza:

https://chinchillasesperanza.jimdo.com/mutaciones/beige-sullivan/


Wellman Recessive Beige

Another recessive beige to be pursued decades ago was the Wellman beige. This beige was very similar to the dominant Tower beige in its coloration but instead had dark eyes similar to standard grey. This beige is also separate from the Sullivan beige as that coloration had bright red eyes while this beige had black or brown eyes. Wellman beiges were typically a bit lighter than the dominant Tower beige, but not quite as light as a homozygous Tower beige animal. Animals that were homozygous for the Wellman beige gene would typically also have an orangey-yellow undertone with orange oxidation that was hard to correct. Unfortunately, there are not any confirmed recessive beiges still in breeding. However, it is suspected that there are still some strains of recessive beige around. With no way to confirm what genetics are at play, it is up to debate whether they are related.


Rzewski Recessive Beige

Another recessive beige that is thought to be related to the Wellman recessive beige was founded in Grywald, Poland by W. Rzewski. These animals were very similar to the Wellman beige as they had black or brown eyes, a white belly and a beige coat that tended to have an orange cast. Mr. Rzewski termed it "pastel mutation" during his time of breeding for it. These animals were very plushy, with an even length of fur with a nice veiling color. These animals also tended to have very light colored, almost white, tails. It was thought that since the Wellman and Rzewski recessive beiges shared these similar traits, they were likely related, with the exception of the Rzewski beiges having more issues of orange oxidation.


Young Lavender Brown

Around 1969, Bobby Young of Bartlesville, Oklahoma produced a beige looking animal. This color, referred to as the Young Lavender Brown, was true to it's name in that it was a pink-gray, beige-type mutation. By 1977, Young had produced several animals with reasonable texture and good appearance. Sunflower Chinchillas of York, Nebraska purchased all of these mutations and carriers. Later on, Ralph and Barb Shoots ended up purchasing these animals with the Sunflower herd.


Albino - Loftis Albino

Just like any animal, albino offspring can pop up in any herd. Albinism is the complete lack of pigmentation in the hair, skin and nails and is completely recessive. This is what separates true albino chinchillas from pink white chinchillas. The pink white contains both the Wilson white mosaic gene and the Tower beige gene. The tower beige causes the eyes to have red pigmentation, the ears to be pink and the coat to be a more creamy white than a grey white. True albino chinchillas completely lack any pigmentation whatsoever. Thus, they are not related to the pink white coloration at all. Unfortunately, true albino chinchillas come with a myriad of health problems. Many were subject to heart failure, blindness and other genetic disorders. Due to these issues, the breeding of these animals was no longer pursued. However, there are still natural instances of albinos popping up in herds as of recently. Sadly, these kits typically do not survive to adulthood and are usually not bred so as to not encourage further health problems.


Stone Recessive White

Another white coloration that was bred years ago was the Stone White. This coloration was similar to the albino in that it was a recessive white with red eyes. However, this color was not classified as albino due to some characteristics its carriers of the gene displayed. Commonly, stone white carriers would have white coloration on their tails and some whites would even have dark ruby red eyes. Both of these indicate the coloration was not truly albino as there was still pigmentation being displayed or carried over. Unfortunately, stone whites commonly had vision problems. Oftentimes, animals that were homozygous for stone white would be born with underdeveloped eyes that they usually kept closed, leading to partial or total blindness. Although it seemed that the eye issues began to improve, this quickly changed. Stone whites were no longer pursued after microopthalmy started to also affect heterozygous animals as well. The lines were culled as a whole to prevent the further breeding of genetic defects.


Sakrison Mutation - Curly Charcoal Brown

This recessive was founded by Lloyd Sakrison of Virginia, Minnesota. It could be quite a dark brown color, but could also be as light as oxblood shoe polish. These animals had markedly curly fur similar to a karakul. These animals were not good breeders and were reasonably small.


Piebald Recessive

Just like with most rodents, the piebald mutation has popped up in chinchillas as well. Although, this mutation proved to be very difficult to pin-point and breed for consistency. A piebald animal is characterized typically as a splash of white or grayish-black on some areas of the animal's coat. Only occasionally were breeders able to line-breed this recessive to create successful results. For those patient enough to try, the markings were typically found in the same spots as their piebald parent. For the most part, the mutation was too time-consuming to pursue.


Chinchilla (Non-Agouti)

Common in other rodents, the non-agouti mutation indicates animals with no bar in the fur. The "bar" is the white portion of the fur shaft of the chinchilla. When blowing into the fur, the coloration of the shaft can be seen. Grey underfur makes the base of the hair shaft, then the white bar section can be seen in the middle. The tips of the fur will then have the coloration of the animal, its veiling and shades. These animals commonly popped up randomly in herds and were not sought after. Animals without a bar were not useful for pelt making as they would not match with other animals who were well-barred. 

Body Type Mutations

Dwarfism

Not to be confused with poorly bred chinchillas, these animals will exhibit other unusual traits. Chinchillas that exhibit dwarfism will typically have a smaller body stature, shortened limbs, a larger head and adults will only weigh around 300-450g. Those with this mutation may have other physical abnormalities such as smaller tails or ears, a hunchback appearance, a broad forehead and the inability to properly jump. Female chinchillas that exhibit the signs of dwarfism should never be bred as their small frame and narrow hips do not allow for the safe birth of kits. Chinchillas with dwarfism should not be bred as they are not proper examples of a show quality chinchilla and the breeding of dwarf females can result in the death of both mother and kits.


Photo By: Sunshine Chinchillas

Disclaimer

Credit is given to all breeders below the image of their animals and their websites are linked. Sunshine Chinchillas does not own, claim to own, or take credit for any of the images used that are not specifically listed as our own. We want to highlight the many different mutations as best as we can for the purpose of education only. Thank you to all the breeders of these exceptional animals. 

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